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CMWaterson White Infinity 2014 Runway MBFWA

White Infinity Headpiece 2014 for Gail Sorronda’s Mermaids Exist: As Above/So Below collection featured at 2014 Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Australia. Photography Courtesy of Gail Sorronda.

I just updated My Folio with a few lovely projects realised in the first half of 2014. Some I’ve posted about before, while others I am yet to share with you in more detail. The projects use a variety of materials, as well as fabrication techniques in combination with hand making by yours truly. ENJOY!

PS There’s still a few top-secret projects that I have to remain hush hush on…for now!

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Colony 2010. Photography Jon Linkins.

Colony 2010. Made in Agathis Australis (New Zealand Kauri or Kauri). Photography Jon Linkins.

After touring Australia for the past year for WOOD: art design architectureColony 2010 came home to Queensland this month and is presently on show at the QUT Art Museum. The Kauri used for Colony 2010 is very old, has passed through many hands and travelled countless miles. In the 1800’s Kauri Pines, tens of thousands of years old were felled in Northern New Zealand and shipped to Australia.

The Making of Colony. Photography Christina Waterson.

This complex work was made possible through working with a highly skilled artisan based near Mapleton, Queensland. His knowledge of making and respect for the wood is evident in the final piece. The precious wood was used as efficiently as possible. Photography Christina Waterson.

This timber was used for bridges, boats and storage vats because of its strength and natural resistance to rot. During this time the Kauri used in Colony 2010 was shipped to Sydney and made into rum vats for the Pyrmont distillery that began operation in the 1890’s. In the early 1990’s the distillery was closed and the Kauri staves from the vats were salvaged.

I grew up in Bundaberg (Queensland) where sugar and rum production were the main industries. Large Bundaberg rum vats similar to those at Pyrmont Distillery. Photo courtesy of Bundaberg Rum.

I grew up in Bundaberg (Queensland) where sugar and rum production were the main industries. Pictured here are large Bundaberg rum vats similar to those from the Pyrmont Distillery. Photo courtesy of Bundaberg Rum Ltd.

Traces of the timber’s previous use have been kept in Colony 2010. Some panels still have the rum visible in their surface: appearing as darker lines and shades. The rum soaked staves wafted of rum as they were machined. Colony 2010 is an experiment. It is a lesson in what not to do with wood. The wood staves have been cut to reveal the patterned end grain of the Kauri to show the age of the original tree. While the timber is very old and stable this type of cutting and tapering has really pushed the material to its limit.

Colony 2010 (Detail). Photography Jon Linkins.

Colony 2010 (Detail). Photography Jon Linkins.

The finite nature of Kauri Pine: the tree and the wood, have informed the work’s arrangement. Colony 2010 is made up of like, repeated parts grouped together for strength, protection and support. At the edges is where the work is vulnerable but also where it is most likely to grow, multiply and seek out new ground.

Colony 2010. Photography Jon Linkins.

Colony 2010 silhouette. The edge holds the greatest potential for growth or vulnerability. Photography Jon Linkins.

At the edges of society, culture and thinking this dichotomy also exists. At these edges creative endeavours, new ideas and ways of thinking push forward into unknown territory or pull back to safer ground. At the edge there is the potential to succeed and grow, or risk everything, fail and retreat. Colony 2010 holds true to this condition by pushing material, form and ideas of function. Its existence is a result of pure belief and a will to strive for something more. Seeing this work again reminded me just how lucky I am to still be on this journey, despite all odds.

WOOD: art design architecture is on show at the QUT Art Museum until 29 June 2014. Check out there website for public programmes, events and workshops related to wood (the material and the exhibition). WOOD: art design architecture resulted from a collaboration between JamFactory Contemporary Craft and Design and Botanic Gardens of Adelaide, where it was presented in February through early April 2013, with the exhibition continuing its national tour throughout 2013 and 2014. Take a closer look at my review of the original exhibition here.

 

 

 

 

 

In this the second instalment of From the Vault I’ve really dug deep and gone back to the early days; showing the diversity and richness of my practice. I’ve sifted through Polaroids, black and white negs, Kodak prints and drawings. Once again the process has been positively affirming. I have included a few descriptions for the harder to place projects and works. Enjoy!

House for Bachelard. Design, drawings and photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

House for Bachelard (1994). Design, models, drawings and photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

This exploratory project, House for Bachelard, was designed while studying Architecture at The University of Queensland in 1994. The 2nd Year Architectural Design Studio was run by Professor John Hockings.

PART 01: ABSTRACTIONS OF HOUSE. On reading The Poetics of Space by Gaston Bachelard, students were asked to communicate its essential concepts via a maquette (concepts such as curved space, corner/huddle, and progression between polar states etc) Through an intensive model making process I explored ‘hidden space’ and tried to capture the feeling of the spaces described in The Poetics of Space. Then in a series of exercises involving the abstraction, duplication and repetition of our original concept model we were challenged to consider the qualities of spaces revealed by this process and match them to the prescribed areas of a brief. The brief was for a weekend house for the author Bachelard.

Abstractions of House study model 1994. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Abstractions of House – Study Model 1 (1994). Photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

Abstractions of House - Study Model 2 (1994). Photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

Abstractions of House – Study Model 2 (1994). Photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

PART 02: HOUSE FOR BACHELARD. My proposition for his ‘house’ was a camp-like structure providing basic necessities for Bachelard’s weekend stays. It was nestled within the landscape of Point Lookout and orientated to minimize oncoming winds. The long landscape wall allowed Gaston to survey the coming weather. It shielded his vegetable garden from the strong winds. The bookshelf was considered as a large ladder that stretched from the cellar, through the reading room and up to Bachelard’s sunny sleeping cone. The cellar lay within the earth and provided a dark cool retreat.

House for Bachelard  - Sectional Project Model (1994). The model was 1.8 meters in length. Photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

House for Bachelard – Sectional Project Model (1994). The model was 1.8 meters in length. The middle and bottom photos are taken from the same view but one shows the ground plane intact while the other reveals in section the cellar below. Photography by Christina Waterson 1994.

Peter Light 2000. Lighting commission for Elision Ensemble's practice space. Photography Christina Waterson 2000.

Peter Light 2000 lighting commission for Elision Ensemble’s practice space, South Brisbane. Photography Christina Waterson 2000.

Raku Test Patterns 2001

Raku Test Patterns 2001. Made during a Ceramic’s Elective while studying Visual Arts at the Queensland University of Technology in 2001. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Ceramic Family of Vessels 2001. For a Ceramic's Elective while studying Visual Arts at the Queensland University of Technology 2001.

Ceramic Family of Vessels 2001. For a Ceramic’s Elective while studying Visual Arts at the Queensland University of Technology in 2001. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Array Study 1 (2007). Polypropylene. Photography David Sandison.

Array Study 01 (2007). Veneer. Photography David Sandison.

Array Study 2 (2007). Polypropylene. Photography David Sandison.

Array Study 02 (2007). Polypropylene. Photography David Sandison.

Fuzzy Dub the concept for reloved Designer stories at the Sysney Powehouse 2010.

Fuzzy Dub (2010) the concept for my reloved – designer stories  piece at the Sydney Powehouse. Concept and drawing by Christina Waterson 2010.

“Once desired and loved but eventually discarded, the essential furniture item – the chair – has a long, rich and often poignant past… Contemporary design and bespoke beauty merge to transform a tired furniture piece into a work of art.” Brief by Sydney Powerhouse 2010.

Find a chair, relove it and tell a story. My response to this brief explored the origins of my own creative spark. The first chairs I distinctly remember were our school chairs and at that time I was heavily into craft especially making pom poms. I playfully combined these two memories together to make Fuzzy Dub for the exhibition. By taking two discarded and outgrown school chairs and binding them with recycled materials (including fishing nets and fabric strips) they were reused to make a large-scale pom pom. The exhibition was held at Sydney Powerhouse as part of the 2010 Sydney Design Festival. It included reloved chairs by Andrew Simpson (Industrial Design), Liesl Hazelton (Jewellery), and Adam Goodrum (Industrial Design).

Fuzzy Dub the process, 2010. Photography by Jon Linkins.

Fuzzy Dub the process (2010). Photography by Jon Linkins.

My finished Fuzzy Dub, 2010. Every time I looked at it it made me laugh! Photography by Jon Linkins.

My complete Fuzzy Dub (2010). Every time I look at Fuzzy Dub it makes me laugh! Pretty fun and out there! Photography by Jon Linkins.

 All works by Christina Waterson. If you would like to check out From the Vault 01, the previous post in this series, click on this link.

 

Tracemetal 2014

Tracemetal 2014. Photography Christina Waterson.

I am excited to announce the launch of TRACEMETAL – a special edition of Tracelet made in stainless steel infused with bronze.

TRACEMETAL’s unique form originates from a set of sculptural studies that extend my woven Komodo Series, released in 2008. Its faceted surface was made by imagining a draped soft material or skin over the bones of these original weavings. These were ‘traced’ and drawn at a bracelet scale, though could be realised at multiple scales and have different functions. Using the latest in 3D technology TRACEMETAL was then made in the Netherlands.

TRACEMETAL’s different colours Umber, Flint and Bronze are achieved through patinas applied to the surface of each bracelet.

Tracemetal 2014

Tracemetal 2014. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracemetal 2014. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracemetal 2014 Detail. Clockwise from left to right – Tracemetal colours Bronze, Flint and Umber. Photography Christina Waterson.

While Tracelet can only be personally given to people I meet, the special edition bracelet TRACEMETAL is available for purchase exclusively in Queensland through the inspirational fashion designer and creative force Gail Sorronda, at Gail Sorronda Concept Store, James St Fortitude Valley.

Stay tuned for special exclusive stockists near you!

Celestial Analogue (Stellar) 2013 - 14. Recycled cardboard and Pigment Paint.

Celestial Analogue (Stellar) 2013 – 14 (recycled cardboard, pigment paint). Photography Christina Waterson.

My latest work, Celestial Analogue, records the ideal geometry of an immeasurable physical experience.

While recently hosting some visiting international friends who had never experienced a clear view of the night sky I rediscovered my own deep memories of the Milky Way. My friends normally live in London where the Milky Way has not been visible since the Industrial Revolution; due to pollution and compounded by big city light spill. Growing up in rural Queensland with a glorious view of the Milky Way I had perhaps taken this familiar sight for granted.

On attempting to explain something so unimaginable, immense and elusive as the Milky Way to my friends who had never witnessed it directly, I realised that it was nigh impossible to communicate the experience. Even images fell short. A visit to a remote location was undertaken to let them experience it directly for themselves.

Detail

Detail from the right side approach. Photography Christina Waterson.

Detail

Zooming into the detail – so close yet so far away. Photography Christina Waterson.

Celestial Analogue emerged from these encounters. Though also very beautiful Celestial Analogue is an ideal representation of this immeasurable physical experience. Repetition of the reduced elements create a sense of movement across the work’s surface. With an ever shifting pattern and spatial rhythm it remains illusive when experienced from different moments and positions.

The Process.

Pieces patiently masked, painted, scribed and cut. Photography Christina Waterson.

Celestial Analogue was patiently assembled from hand cut, painted and folded recycled cardboard. It meaningfully extends my previous collections of work including The Bloom Series 2009, Taking Flight 2010 and Scale Screen 2012.

Celestial Analogue Detail.

Celestial Analogue (Stellar) 2013- 14 view from the left side approach. Photography Christina Waterson.

PS I must admit it was hard to photograph this work in the exhibition space. With every passing car reflected light rays created hot spots and cool spots across the work. I endeavour to return one night and re-photograph the work more evenly lit.

Yellow Field 1996 remade for a private collection 2010. Photography Jon Linkins.

Yellow Field 1996 remade for a Private Collection 2010. Christina Waterson. Photography Jon Linkins.

Creative practice for me involves a daily ritual of making. And if I’m not making I am installing; photographing; trying to gain deeper understanding; packing; revaluing; playing with; transporting or beautifully rediscovering each study, artwork or design in their own unique light.

Here are a selection of studies and works from the Christina Waterson Archive or Vault (as I like to call it) some of which you may or may not have seen. Sharing work from the vault gives me perspective and lets me see work with fresh eyes. Enjoy!

Near Far Study 1996.  Collection of the Artist. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Near Far Study 1996. Christina Waterson. Collection of the Artist. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Proofred 1999. Process Documentation of Work-Light Studies. Photography Christina Waterson.

Proofred 1999. Process documentation of work-light studies. Photography Christina Waterson.

Screen studies on Llght and reflections, 2009. Realised through a Brisbane City Council Creative Sparks Grant.

Screen studies on light and reflection 2009. Realised through my Brisbane City Council Creative Sparks Grant. Photography Christina Waterson. (These are small – the size of a small notebook each)

Rhosshilli Study 2009. Ipswich Art Gallery Collection. Photography Jon Linkins.

Rhosshilli (Mapping) Study 2009. Christina Waterson. Ipswich Art Gallery Collection. Photography Jon Linkins.

Light Pixels (Bloom Series) 2009. Photography Jon Linkins.

Light Pixels (Bloom Series) 2009. Christina Waterson. Photography Jon Linkins.

Clove Bowl (Bloom Series) 2009.Photography Jon Linkins.

Clove Bowl (Bloom Series) 2009. Photography Jon Linkins.

Inseparable Butterflies 2012. Commission for the Peninsula Hotel, Hong Kong. Photography Christina Waterson. (Scale can sometimes be deceiving this work is over 1700mm wide)

Inseparable Butterflies 2012. Commission for the Peninsula Hotel, Hong Kong. Photography Christina Waterson. (Scale can sometimes be deceiving this work is over 1700mm wide)

Soft Cell Study 2012 with Shadow Set shadows. Photography Tobias Titz.

Soft Cell Study 2012 with Shadow Set shadows. Photography Tobias Titz.

Stay tuned for more from the vault…

Tracelet 2012. Specialist injection moulded SAN bracelets in custom colours. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracelet 2012. Injection moulded SAN bracelets in custom colours. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracelet 2012. Specialist injection moulded SAN bracelets in custom colours. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracelet 2012. Injection moulded SAN bracelets in custom colours. Photography Christina Waterson.

Scale Screen 2012. Custom folded aluminium with powdercoat finish. Photography Tobias Titz.

Scale Screen 2012. Custom folded aluminium with powdercoat finish. Photography Tobias Titz.

Shadow Set 2012. Recycled rubber with stainless steel pins. Photography Jon Linkins.

Shadow Set 2012. Recycled rubber with stainless steel pins. Photography Jon Linkins.

Shadow Set 2012. Recycled rubber with stainless steel pins. Photography Jon Linkins.

Shadow Set 2012. Recycled rubber with stainless steel pins. Photography Jon Linkins.

Thread Screen 2010. Marine plywood and rope. Photography Jon Linkins.

Thread Screen 2010. Marine plywood and rope. Photography Tobias Titz.

The Bloom Series 2009. Seven piece furniture and home wares range. Photography Jon Linkins.

The Bloom Series 2009. Seven piece furniture and home wares range. Photography Jon Linkins.

Lift Stool and Tilt Mag Rack (Bloom Series) 2009. Marine plywood. Photography Jon Linkins.

Lift Stool and Tilt Mag Rack (Bloom Series) 2009. Marine plywood. Photography Jon Linkins.

Jet, Mist and Fruit Pixels (Bloom Series) 2009. Recycled Acrylic. Photography Jon Linkins.

Jet, Mist and Fruit Pixels (Bloom Series) 2009. Recycled Acrylic. Photography Jon Linkins.

1/2 Tilt Platter and Fruit Pixels (Bloom Series) 2009. Marine plywood and recycled acrylic. Photography Jon Linkins.

1/2 Tilt Platter and Fruit Pixels (Bloom Series) 2009. Marine plywood, recycled acrylic. Photography Jon Linkins.

Komodo Series Forms 2009. Recycled cardboard, polypropylene, and stainless steel. Photography Jon Linkins.

Komodo Series Forms 2008. Cardboard, polypropylene, and stainless steel. Photography David Sandison.

Komodo Series Screens 2009. Hand woven plywood with stainless steel fixings. Photography Aidan Murphy.

Komodo Series Screens 2008. Hand woven plywood with stainless steel fixings. Photography Aidan Murphy.

Plexa Screen (Komodo Series) 2009. Hand woven plywood with stainless steel fixings. Photography Aidan Murphy.

Plexa Screen (Komodo Series) 2008. Hand woven plywood, stainless steel fixings. Photography Aidan Murphy.

X-Screen (Komodo Series) 2009. Hand woven plywood with stainless steel fixings. Photography Aidan Murphy.

X-Screen (Komodo Series) 2008. Hand woven plywood with stainless steel fixings. Photography Jon Linkins.

Taking Flight (Conceptual View) 2010. Custom folded aluminium with powdercoat finish. Photography Aidan Murphy.

Taking Flight (Conceptual View) 2010. Folded aluminium with powdercoat finish. Photography Jon Linkins.

Taking Flight (Installation View) 2010. Custom folded aluminium with powdercoat finish. Photography Jon Linkins.

Taking Flight (Installation View) 2010. Folded aluminium with powdercoat finish. Photography Jon Linkins.

Array Ceiling (RAIA Awards Edition) 2007. Recycled cardboard and stainless steel. Photography CFJ Photography.

Array Ceiling (RAIA Awards Edition) 2007. Cardboard and stainless steel. CFJ Photography.

Array Ceiling (RAIA Awards Edition) 2007. Recycled cardboard and stainless steel. Photography CFJ Photography.

Array Ceiling (RAIA Awards Edition) 2007. Cardboard and stainless steel. CFJ Photography.

Veil Light (Ocular Series) 2002. Drafting film and cotton thread. Photography Tobias Titz.

Veil Light (Ocular Series) 2002. Drafting film and cotton thread. Photography Tobias Titz.

Remember Surface Study (Ocular Series) 2002. Drafting film and cotton thread. Photography Tobias Titz.

Remember Surface Study (Ocular Series) 2002. Drafting film. Photography Tobias Titz.