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CMWaterson-Flourish---Life-Size-Prototype-12-May-2015-s

An excited me next to the final full size prototype of one of the Flourishes. This was made for final sign-off of the central element details. Photograph by Poppy Veerasawmy (Creative Facade).

BACKGROUND

In early 2014 I was shortlisted, along with three other Australian Artists, to competitively bid for The Milton Artwork Public Artwork Façade opportunity. Each artist had six weeks to develop a unique artwork concept and submit a detailed expression of interest that included their artwork concept, composition, buildability and fabrication methodology.

CMWaterson---Flourish-Conceptual-Background-2014

Concept behind Flourish – Patterns of Milton’s early land use and how they mirrored some of the micro structures within native and crop species.

After visiting Milton and undertaking research into the site’s history I was intrigued by Milton’s development over time. Of particular interest were the patterns of early land use and how they mirrored the micro cellulose structures within native and crop species. I  tested my initial concepts using a series of small handmade models. Some of the models just tested the individual elements’ form, while larger studies explored the overall composition and visual permeability of the artwork. These studies then directly informed the 3D computer models and renders. Flourish’s composition frames a field’s edge where native flora have re-grown and flourished.

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CMWaterson---Marquettes-of-Flourish-2015

Different from all angles – Flourish handmade artwork of a small portion of The Milton Artwork Facade for my Concept Proposal, February 2014 (Dimensions 550 x 375mm). Photography Christina Waterson.

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Concept render of view from within the spaces behind Flourish, prepared for my Milton Artwork Facade Concept Proposal, February 2014.

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Initial concept render of Flourish – thrive prosper bloom, February 2014. The artwork marks the Railway Terrace entrance to Milton Train Station.

My final EOI included the Flourish artwork concept; handmade models; facade elevations and sections; interior and exterior views; assembly methodology; as well as detailed quotations from three local manufacturers.

In late 2014 to my joy I’d successfully been selected as the preferred artist for the project.

CMWaterson-Flourish-Final-Render-Revision-Issued-4-December-2014

Showing colour and how the work progressed throughout the process – here is the revised concept render of Flourish presented to the BCC.

After initial briefing with the Project Stakeholders I incorporated their great feedback to add colour and further develop the composition option that incorporated a central dimensional flourish design framed by flatter border panels. At the end of 2014 my revised composition was approved by the Client and submitted to the Brisbane City Council (BCC).

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT, FABRICATION  AND INSTALLATION

Team meetings with the client, fabricators and documenters for design development, documentation and prototyping happened in the first half of 2015.

CMWaterson-Flourish Half Scale Prototype 2015

One of many prototypes made by Auzmet for Hutchinson Builders, during Design Development and Documentation. Pictured is a half scale prototype of a central Flourish element with the border design. Photography by Christina Waterson.

This was an intensive and rewarding process in which details of the artwork and its elements were streamlined for material properties and sheet efficiency; as well as for the fabrication process. The artwork’s overall layout was further developed during this time to accommodate weight and support requirements. The design of the fretwork was developed to meet the revised free air requirements in those areas while also concealing the artworks orthogonal support frame. I worked closely with Poppy Veerasawmy (Creative Facade) throughout this process.

The final colours (based on native flower species), artwork layout and details were signed off in May 2015 with the approved design being fabricated in June and July. It was really great that the artwork was made in Brisbane by local manufacturers who specialise in metal fabrication and coating. It meant I could visit each fabricator on a regular basis, stay in touch with progress and photograph the fabrication process.

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Just a few of the 200 or more Flourish parts awaiting finishing and transport to the painters. Photography by Christina Waterson.

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Labelling of parts that make up the central Flourish panels prior to coating. Photography by Christina Waterson.

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At the painters each element was painted prior to assembly. Photography by  Christina Waterson.

CMWaterson---Start-of-Installation-of-Flourish-2015

CMWaterson---Installation-of-Flourish-2015

During installation of the central Flourish area. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Installation started in August and was completed in September 2015. I visited the site weekly to see how the artwork had grown. It was an affirming experience to witness it evolve to completion. The details that we’d worked through during design development/documentation contributed to the overall effect and success of the artwork.

CMWaterson-The-Milton-Artwork-Facade-23-July-2015

CMWaterson-The-Milton-Artwork-Facade-Railyway-Terrace-View

View to Flourish – thrive prosper bloom from Railway Terrace footpath. Photography by Christina Waterson.

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Different from different angles: An acute detailed view to Flourish – thrive prosper bloom north along Railway Terrace. Photography by Christina Waterson.

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An acute detailed view Flourish – thrive prosper bloom south along Railway Terrace. Photography by Christina Waterson.

CMWaterson---Flourish-2015

Flourish – thrive prosper bloom 2015 from Railway Terrace, Milton. Photography by Christina Waterson.

CMWaterson-Front-Flourish-Srtwork-Facade-2015

Long front view of Flourish from Manning Street approach. Photography by Christina Waterson.

Since Flourish’s completion I’ve received lovely feedback from visitors to Milton. People especially love the artwork elements, colour and the way the composition looks different from all angles.

PROJECT DETAILS

Client: Commissioned by Aveo Group Ltd and Hutchinson Builders

Name: Flourish – thrive prosper bloom 2015

Medium: Painted steel

Location: The Milton Residences, 55 Railway Terrace Milton, Queensland, Australia.

Artwork Area: Over 440 sqm

Built locally in Brisbane by Hutchinson Builders through Auzmet, Creative Facade, GCI Group, and Peerless Painting and Sandblasting.

Night Time Street View of Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014.

Night Time Street View of Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014.

During April and May 2014 I was privileged to display Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014 Edition within artisan’s Ivory Street Window, Fortitude Valley. A small preliminary study of Soft Cell was first exhibited in 2012 as part of my solo exhibition Trace at Pinup Project Space, Melbourne. This study was made in cork rubber. By this time other studies and tests of Soft Cell at a small-scale had also been made in leather, felt and fabric.

Trace Exhibition Studies at Pinup 2012. Photography Tobias Titz.

Trace exhibition studies at Pinup Project Space in 2012. Study of Soft Cell 2012 top-far left. Photography Tobias Titz.

Soft Cell represented a deliberate desire to work with softer materials and forms. My Churchill Fellowship experience profoundly moved me to follow this softer approach, having predominantly worked with more linear and rectilinear geometric elements throughout my practice until that time. After my exhibition at Pinup Project Space I spent a busy year running around the countryside creative directing. There was not much time for making in the studio.

Soft Cell Ivory Street Window Installation prep.

Soft Cell Ivory Street Window Installation test layouts and preparation. April 2014.

In 2013 I committed to realising Soft Cell at a larger scale in more vibrant colours and everyday materials. A successful application in 2013 to display Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014 Edition in artisan’s Ivory Street Window got the ball rolling.

After spending many years starting with hard materials and hard forms I found the result more often than not was “hard”. I set to making with soft materials and soft forms with a hope to relax and make softer works. Christina Waterson 2012

Soft undulating rhythmic forms make up the Soft Cell family. Each generation of form, while unique, originate from the same simple element combined in different ways. Making Soft Cell required me to move differently; using softer and less controlled movements than those used to make The Komodo Series and Bloom Series. These softer circular movements used different muscles in my body. Within the work the compression and tension imbued in each form’s surface did require my concentration and some good timing.

A sample of the layout options considered for the Ivory Street Edition of Soft Cell. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

A sample of the layout options considered for the Ivory Street Edition of Soft Cell. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell marked a shift from previous installations within the Ivory Street Window. My two previous installations within Ivory Street Window were more linear in nature. They were also made with a single material of predominantly one colour.  The Soft Cell 2014 installation could have taken an infinite number of layouts as shown above, in the preliminary sample options (L and C) for my original application. I decided on a geometric tartan layout (R).

Day time street view of Sequence 01 of Soft Cell.

Day time street view of Stage 02 of Soft Cell’s evolution. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Sequence of Growth Showing (L >R) Stage 02, Stage 03 and Stage 05. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Sequence of Growth (L >R) Stage 02, Stage 03 and Stage 05. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

The installation grew over time and evolved through a sequence of patterns. In doing this my hope was to draw people closer to inspect the work’s detail and form, and maybe ponder what the forms might remind them of, or how each colour might stir different memories and associations.

Vivid recollections and studies borne from a sense of rediscovering a distinctly Australian sense of nature and place are brought to light through this new collection. While the Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream Edition of Soft Cell uses everyday materials found in our homes, up close the materials’ colour, fluidity and overlay transport us to another place and suggest different flora, fauna and landscapes. One may see a hint of parrots, waves, jellyfish or a flourish of orchids in the overlapping arabesques. It’s these tactile curves and arabesques that form the essence of things – the soft cells. Christina Waterson Artist Statement 2014

Soft Cell Hues reminds me of orchids. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Hues. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Hues. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Hues. Photography Christina Waterson.

CMWaterson-Tweaking-Soft-Cell-on-Opening-Night-15-May-2014

Tweaking Soft Cell on the opening night of the exhibition. Stage 05 of Soft Cell’s evolution. Photography Richard Stride for artisan.

My work continues on the Soft Cell family of surfaces and forms. STAY TUNED as this new collection truly reaches its full potential!

 

 

Fall 2002 Installation Concept for Ivory Street Window Installation in 2005 part of Unleashed 2005, artisan. Illustration by Christina Waterson.

Fall 2002 Concept for Ivory Street Window Installation in 2005 part of Unleashed 2005, artisan. Illustration by Christina Waterson.

Over almost a decade I have enjoyed exhibiting my large-scale installations in artisan’s Ivory Street Window. The space is perfect; it’s protected while being very public; outward looking to Ivory and Brunswick Street and therefore an accessible way to present to people who wouldn’t ordinarily get to engage with my larger scale works. People can appreciate the installations there day and night as they walk, drive or bus by. The space also affords a different understanding of ones work through the light, movement, near and far approach; and the scale of the window space and street itself.

I’ve presented installations in artisan’s Ivory Street Window at key moments in my practice. Here I share with you a snap shot of the three installations undertaken in 2005, 2008 and most recently 2014.

Fall 2002 Detail of Ivory Street Installation 2005. Photography Andrea Higgins for artisan.

Fall 2002 Detail of Ivory Street Installation 2005. Photography Andrea Higgins for artisan.

Fall 2002 was installed in artisan’s Ivory Street Window in 2005 as part of Unleashed exhibition.  Fall’s interlocking stainless steel elements cascade against the surface of the wall with its elements able to be reconfigured into a hanging installation (Rest 2002) and stacked horizontally (Align 2002).

Front View.

Fall 2002 Detail of Ivory Street Installation 2005. Photography Christina Waterson.

Gravity transformed the perfect geometric forms into a scurry of movement and light. The stainless steel elements quivered with slight changes in air flow and their thin edges reflected the smallest presence of light. Street and traffic lights as well as headlights of passing cars were beautifully reflected in the work’s thin stainless steel edges. Fall is now an important part of my personal collection and takes pride of place in my living room.

Plexus 2008 installed in artisan's Ivory Street Window in 2008. Photography by Andrea Higgins for artisan.

Plexus #1 2008 installed in artisan’s Ivory Street Window in 2008. Photography by Andrea Higgins for artisan.

Plexa #1 (Cardboard Prototype) 2008 prested inIvory Street in 2008. Photography Andrea Higgins for artisan.

Plexus #1 (Cardboard Prototype Komodo Series) 2008 hand cut and woven in recycled cardboard. Presented in artisan’s Ivory Street in 2008. Photography Andrea Higgins for artisan.

In 2008 I showcased a preliminary hand cut cardboard prototype of Plexus #1 (Part of the Komodo Series launched later that year at Living Edge, Brisbane). The series includes three-dimensional arrays, weavings and sculptural objects that explore beautiful repetitive, structural forms at a variety of scales.

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Plexus #1 (Cardboard Prototype Komodo Series) 2008 detail showing the space of the window and materiality of the work. Photography Andrea Higgins for artisan.

As people moved past the the window installation they would see ever shifting tessellation between the work and its shadow. Closer inspection revealed the delightful materiality and complexity of the interwoven elements. Over the month Plexus #1 was in artisan’s Ivory Street Window it evolved and grew; with new elements added weekly until it finally filled the window.

Day time street view of Sequence 01 of Soft Cell.

Day time street view of Sequence 01 – Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014. Photography Christina Waterson.

CMWaterson-Tweaking-Soft-Cell-on-Opening-Night-15-May-2014

Dusk street view of Sequence 04 – Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014. Photography Courtesy of Richard Stride for artisan.

Soft Cell 2014 was installed during May 2014. The installation evolved through five distinct sequences and was a playful and colourful installation of my latest collection and softer direction.

Night Time Street View of Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014.

Night time street view of the final sequence of growth – Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014. Photography Christina Waterson.

More on this my latest installation – Soft Cell 2014 and the whole collection in a future post! STAY TUNED!

THANK YOU artisan; idea skill product for supporting my work through display and exhibition over the past decade. 

 

 

A happy dance celebrating the Hightide Exhibition opening at artisan, Fortitude Valley Brisbane. Photo by Darcy Clarke.

A happy dance celebrating the Hightide Exhibition opening at artisan, Fortitude Valley Brisbane. Photo by Darcy Clarke.

With the fabulous Hightide: Queensland Design Now exhibition on show at artisan for only one more week, I thought I would share some of my work featured in the exhibition – up close and personal specially for all my interstate and international friends!

Final touches on the X-screen.

Final touches being made to solid timber X-screen (Komodo Series 2008) on installation day. Photography Simone Jones (artisan).

X-Screen view from below. I love the complexity of the weaving and the play of shadow from this angle.

X-Screen view from below. I love the complexity of the weaving and the play of shadow from this angle. Photography Christina Waterson.

Story Boxes showing the conceptual development of each project and relationships between them.

My special story boxes showing the conceptual development of work displayed and relationships between each series. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracelet Story Box.

Tracelet Story Box – tracing the conceptual development and potential of Tracelet 2012. Photography Christina Waterson.

Tracelet was on show alongside pieces that formed its conceptual development. These were presented in one of my archive story boxes that I make for each of my projects, installations or collections.

Story Box Construction for The Bloom Series.

The Bloom Series 2009 Story Box showing the original small sculptural studies as well as formation of the seven piece furniture and home wares range. Photography Christina Waterson.

And my personal favourites Lift Stool and Tilt Mag Rack from the Bloom Series 2009.

And my personal favourites Lift Stool and Tilt Mag Rack from the Bloom Series 2009. Photography Christina Waterson.

For those who can make to the exhibition before it ends drop into to artisan: idea skill product until 8 February 2014 to see all of the designers’ great work on show!

SOME GREAT NEWS ON THE WAY. Enjoy your day!

Jacaranda in bloom at the University of Queensland, St Lucia.

Jacarandas in bloom at the University of Queensland, St Lucia (October 2013).

An early hot Australian summer saw many flowering trees bloom early. Delicate blooms with startling colours provided a haven for birds and insects. Here are a few of my favourites that bloomed in succession – some native and others embraced just the same as part of our urban landscape and lives.

Flame Tree on Gloucester Street, Highgate Hill.

A majestic Illawarra Flame Tree on Gloucester Street, Highgate Hill, Queensland (October 2013).

I was in Melbourne when the Silky Oak's were in bloom (near Space Furniture in Richmond, Melbourne Victoria).

I was in Melbourne when the Silky Oak’s burnt honey blooms were in flower. This one spotted near SPACE Furniture in Richmond, Melbourne, Victoria (November 2013).

Arcade of Tamarind Trees flowering along Dornoch Terrace, Highgate Hill.

Arcade of Tamarind Trees flowering along Dornoch Terrace, Highgate Hill, Queensland (December 2013).

Fragrant Fiddle Wood Tree on Dornoch Terrace, Highgate Hill (January 2014).

Fragrant Fiddle Wood Trees on Dornoch Terrace, Highgate Hill, Queensland (January 2014).

Such electric colours!

All photos by Christina Waterson.

Moments at Sunset on 11 November 2013.

Through the clouds. Moments at sunset on 11 November 2013…

During the time I’ve had the pleasure of living with an expansive view of the western sky, I can say that never have I witnessed such glorious sunsets as those experienced in November 2013. Every afternoon I was drawn to my balcony like a joyful child in wonder of the play of light. Each sunset was so different and within a night’s dusk period the sky was transformed into many glorious moments that unfolded and continuously evolved. Some days there were wild storms followed by electric fluorescent colours or silver linings. Other days were more modest with hazy clouds and delicate highlights.

Here I have selected my favourite sunset moments from the month – many of which occurred all in the same afternoon – the sky transforming before ones eyes in the space of minutes. The 18th of November was a particularly amazing sunset day! Please enjoy the sheer beauty and immensity of nature captured here!

...colour intensifies...

…colour intensifies…

...until the sun appears like a skirling orb on the horizon.

…until the sun appears like an orb zooming past on the horizon. 11 November 2013.

Electric colours. Moments at sunset on 14 november 2014.

Electric colours! Moments at sunset on 14 November 2014…

...close up...

…close up a tutti-frutti love dream…

...a little later on 14 November 2013.

…and a little later on 14 November 2013.

Moment at Sunset on 15 November 2013.

A deadline and a super cell. Moments at sunset on 15 November 2013.

Moments at Sunset 18 November 2013

Storm front threatens. Moments at sunset on 18 November 2013…

...rain on the horizon...

…needed rain on the horizon…

Moments at Sunset on 18 November 2013

…and then a silver lining…

...30 minutes later

… 20 minutes later…WOW…

...5 minutes later...

…5 minutes later…

...an explosion of colour in the clouds...

…an explosion of colour in the clouds…

...and on the horizon...

…and on the horizon…

...fade to black

…to eventually fade to black. 18 November 2013.

Colours have not been altered. All photography Christina Waterson.

Brisbane News Issue 959 Cover

Feature: Design in Focus. Brisbane News Issue 959 Cover. Courtesy of Brisbane News.

This week a great article about Hightide: Queensland Design Now Exhibition was published in Brisbane News. A sample of designers, whose work is featured in the exhibition, were interviewed by Jane Scott and photographed by Richard Waugh and Megan Slade for Brisbane News. They included Jason Bird (author of Hightide, Luxxbox), Surya Graf (Sugarfry, Snack-on, Street and Garden) and Christina Waterson (yours truly).

Decade of Design.

Decade of Design: Jason Bird (Luxxbox) author of the Hightide: Queensland Design Now Book pictured within the exhibition at artisan, Fortitude Valley. Brisbane News Issue 959.

Brisbane News Issue 959

Surya Graf relaxing on his Wave Bench, Sunshine Coast. Christina Waterson pictured with X-Screen. Brisbane News Issue 959.

Jane Scott from Brisbane News was great to speak with. The interview felt more like an enjoyable conversation than a formal interview. Photographer Richard Waugh visited my studio to take the photograph for the Brisbane News article. We had a lot of fun and Richard captured some great photos with the natural light pouring in from the south. Thank you Jane and Richard!

Have a read of the article and let me know what you think! And definitely visit the Hightide: Queensland Design Now Exhibition to see the great work of all of the designers up close. The exhibition runs until 8 February 2014, at artisan: idea skill product in Fortitude Valley.