Archive

Tag Archives: connecting

Christina Waterson Website 2015

christinawaterson.com homepage. For all project details and photography credits go to christinawaterson.com

Our new website went live late last year and since then we’ve received some lovely feedback and interesting projects. If you haven’t checked it out yet please head on over to christinawaterson.com

CMWaterson About PLexa Project Page 2015

Project: Plexa #1 on the William Jolly Bridge, 2015. Photography Christina Waterson

There you’ll find featured a selection of our favourite projects and collaborations; beautiful photography; and a little background to our projects.

CMWaterson _Advocacy Page 2015

Advocacy highlight page at christinawaterson.com  For all project details and photography credits go to christinawaterson.com

You’ll also find info about some of the great Clients we’ve worked with as well as some insight into the depth of our creative practice in Art, Design and Advocacy.

Thank you to Wes Davis (Founder of Netprophets and MoPad) for a great website and hosting, and being an awesome creative to collaborate with; and Craig Rochfort (Founder of Jane Fender, Co-founder of the brand Art Park and founder of Rochfort Design Management) for beautiful curation of content. A Dream Team!

 

 

 

The launch of the Stellar Collection at Tait's Sydney Showroom. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of Tait.

The launch of the Stellar Collection at TAIT’S Sydney Showroom. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

The Stellar Collection was launched in Melbourne and Sydney during October and November 2014. I so enjoyed these events with TAIT because after all our hard work we shared Stellar with such lovely people. It’s a pleasure to post a transcript of the short speech I gave on the occasion of the launch of Stellar in Sydney, on 6 November 2014.

In the moment welcoming guests

Christina Waterson in the moment welcoming guests. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Thank you for sharing this special evening with us as we launch the Stellar Collection.

The Stellar Collection was inspired by the night sky. As a child I was in awe of the Milky Way’s beauty and would spend many a hot summer’s night out on the water tank star watching. My brothers and I would look for satellites and shooting stars, often making our own constellations using the stars we could see, and our different interests as a reference point. This playfulness is at the heart of the Stellar Collection as it encourages people to become modern-day astronomers, making their own constellations and patterns in the form of sculptural screens, ceilings, wall reliefs and objects.

While the names and patterns for our traditional constellations are inherited from Greek mythology, almost every culture on earth envisaged patterns in the stars that captured their unique culture and nature. For Stellar’s signature patterns I re-imagined the stars in the night sky to form a set of new constellations based on the patterns and lines of Australian flora and fauna.

Avid audience

Avid audience listens to Gordon Tait’s MCing for the Sydney Launch of Stellar. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Tonight we are launching three signature patterns in the Stellar Collection called Kingii, Banksia and Rosella. Kingii reflects the distinct form of the Frilled-neck lizard’s open mouth. Patterns within the Banksia’s flower spikes at different stages of growth and blooming are reflected in the Banksia pattern. And my favourite pattern in the collection, Rosella, captures the moment when a family of Rosellas (birdies) alight from feeding on grass seed and pine nuts.

My passion is to create large-scale intricate surfaces whose depth, detail, and effect on light and shadow transform and bring a finer grain to the spaces around us. Therefore it’ only natural that Stellar’s elements form sculptural screens, wall reliefs and ceilings. The elements also make both functional and sculptural objects and we have a few of our favourites on show tonight.

We are delighted to share the Stellar Collection with you and can’t wait to see the unique patterns, objects and colour combinations that you create with Stellar.

Thank you and enjoy the evening.

What a wonderful evening. Thank you to all who attended for making it so special!

What a wonderful evening made special by the lovely guests. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Gordon Tait and Susan Tait.

Gordon and Susan Tait sharing a special moment with Christina Waterson. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Stellar is a credit to all involved in the process. A massive thank you to Susan and Gordon Tait for your generosity of spirit and belief in realising the Stellar Collection. Thank you to TAIT’S fabulous team whose skill and expertise across all areas of streamlining, fabricating and sharing Stellar make it unique. To Max&You thank you for your amazing energy on all things marketing and publicity of Stellar for TAIT, and especially such enjoyable launch events. Thank you Mr Cameron Bruhn for MCing Stellar’s Melbourne Launch, and Gordon Tait for MCing the Stellar’s Sydney Launch – you both brought a personal touch through the insights you shared.

Thank you to all who attended the launch events – it was great meeting such lovely, enthusiastic and talented individuals.

Visit TAIT for more information about the Stellar Collection.

Silky Oak in bloom. Photography Christina Waterson.

Silky Oak in bloom. Photography Christina Waterson.

I have had so many beautiful things make me smile and bring me joy over the last few months. A small selection is included here. You may notice that some of the images are in a square format. That’s because they are from my instagram account that I’ve been experimenting with. Check out more images and inspiration at my instagram.

Amazing visions of beauty by Fashion Designer and creative Force Gail Sorronda for her Mermaids Exist Collection. Pictured here is shimmering model Chelsea Crawford wearing the Undercurrent Neckpiece by Christina Waterson for Gail Sorronda. Hair by Redken Australia and Makeup by Mac Cosmetics.Photography by Megan Cullen. Photo Courtesy of Gail Sorronda.

Amazing visions of beauty by Fashion Designer and creative force Gail Sorronda for her Mermaids Exist Collection. Pictured here is shimmering model Chelsea Crawford wearing the Undercurrent Neckpiece by Christina Waterson for Gail Sorronda. Hair by Redken Australia and Makeup by Mac Cosmetics. Photography Megan Cullen. Photo Courtesy of Gail Sorronda.

Studio Artefact Student's work. I am pictured with Ross Summergreene as we critique our Studio's work for Project 1 in ARCH2200, University of Queensland. Photography by Daniel Byung.

Studio Artefact Student’s work. I am pictured with Ross Summergreene as we critique our Studio’s work for Project 1, ARCH2200 at The University of Queensland. Photography Daniel Byung.

Watching people watching fireworks. Photography Christina Waterson.

Watching people watching fireworks. Photography Christina Waterson.

Love for earthenware. Czech Deco circa 1920's to 30's by Ditmar Urbach pictured. Also sometimes known as 'Alienware' by US Collectors. Photography Christina Waterson.

Love for earthenware. Czech Deco circa 1920’s to 30’s by Ditmar Urbach pictured. Also sometimes known as ‘Alienware’ by US Collectors. Photography Christina Waterson.

Appreciating a unique moment after a storm. Photography Christina Waterson.

Appreciating a unique moment after a storm. Photography Christina Waterson.

Beautiful birdie vase from Cibi with a full tail of flowers by Minka. Photography Christina Waterson.

Beautiful birdie vase from Cibi with flower tail by Minka. Photography Christina Waterson.

The strange little things I collect, like these Japanese Sugar Sticks. Photography Christina Waterson.

The strange little things I collect like these Japanese Sugar Sticks. Photography Christina Waterson.

Launching the Stellar Collection with the amazing TAIT. Pictured is but one of the sculptural screens in the Stellar Collection. More on that to come! Photography Christina Waterson.

Launching the Stellar Collection with the amazing TAIT. More on that to come! Pictured is one of the sculptural screens in the Stellar Collection. I love those shadows.  Photography Christina Waterson.

 

 

Scale Screen 2012 by Christina Waterson (Detail). Photography by Tobias Titz 2012.

With the Stellar Collection of sculptural screens and wall reliefs etc. soon to be launched in Spring 2014 by the fabulous Australian furniture icon TAIT, let’s have a look back at a post from March 2012 showing the development of Scale Screen 2012. Here in full follows the original post – ENJOY! You can also see the original post here!

The development of Scale Screen occurred over many years. This project was assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body (through a New Work – Established – Australia Council Grant)Scale Screen’s origins are linked to my Bloom Series Home-wares and furniture range, launched in 2009. Scale Screen’s origins are linked to my Bloom Series Home-wares and Furniture range, launched in 2009. From the outset of the development of The Bloom Series, I had always envisioned Pixel Screen (pictured below) to be realised in coated sheet metal.

Pixel Screen part of The Bloom Series 2009 by Christina Waterson. Photography by Jon Linkins 2009.

Through the Australian Council Grant I rationalised the design of Pixel Screen in coated sheet metal to ensure modularity, as well as fabrication and installation ease. Importantly throughout this process I maintained the essential qualities of the original artwork. The streamlining of Pixel Screen however meant the adaption was different enough to warrant a new name. The name Scale Screen comes from the form of the elements that make up the screen. They look like reptile scales (especially Brown Snakes or Frilly Necked Lizards, and also like the opened mouth of a Frilly Necked Lizard) so the name directly reflects this quality and also references my unique country Australian childhood;

The surface, colour and depth of the Scale Screen project is informed by the skin of Taipan and King Brown snakes. In my hometown of Sharon in Queensland, the remnants of shedded snakeskin on timber joists proves a reminder of the local reptilian residents – snakes rub on the rough joists to break their skin for the process of shedding. Amongst Australia’s most aggressive and poisonous snakes, the beauty of their skin belies their potential danger. I play with the duality of the notions of protective efficiency and deadly beauty as being inherent to Australian native flora and fauna.

In the foreground: Scale Screen 2012 Photography by Tobias Titz 2012.

A distant and more acute view of Scale Screen 2012 to the right. Photography by Tobias Titz 2012.

My works are intended to be experienced in space, time and light. This is particularly clear in the development of Scale Screen 2012. The patterns within its surface are 3-dimensional; they are patterns that exist in space – new patterns are revealed and continuously evolve as you walk around the work.

I applied the knowledge I gained through the Australia Council Grant Research and Development to other subsequent commissions. Taking Flight (pictured below) uses the same fabrication techniques as Scale Screen but has dramatic differences in form and concept.

Taking Flight 2011

Conceptual Photography of Scale Screen’s sister work Taking Flight 2011 (Folded Aluminium wall relief commissioned by Aurecon) directly used the skills and knowledge from developing Scale Screen. Photography by Jon Linkins 2010.

Taking Flight 2011 by Christina Waterson installed in Aurecon’s Brisbane Head Office Reception. This work aimed to capture a sense of action and growth; similar to birds alighting from a forest or the flourish of blooms in spring. Photography by Jon Linkins 2011.

Scale Screen 2012 Detail by Christina Waterson within Trace at Pin-up Architecture and Design Project Space. Photography by James Braund.

Scale Screen 2012 Detail by Christina Waterson within Trace at Pin-up Architecture and Design Project Space. Photography by James Braund 2012.

I would like to sincerely thank the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body for assisting the Scale Screen project.

Go to TAIT’s Website and TAIT’s Blog for all news on the launch of the Stellar Collection in Spring 2014.

Tracelet (Limited 777) Editions 1 (Salmon - Lemon Aqua) and 2 (Scarlet - Vanilla - Baby Blue) released in 2012.

Tracelet (Limited 777) Editions 1 (Salmon – Lemon – Aqua) and 2 (Scarlet – Vanilla – Baby Blue) released in 2012.

With some exciting news to be announced in regards to Tracelet this week I thought I would REPOST about the Tracelet Project.

It’s been just over a year since the Tracelet Project (777 Limited) was launched at Brisbane’s Saturday in Design 2012 (SID). Over that time two colour editions have been released and I have personally given more than 700 Tracelet sets to people in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, London, Hong Kong and Singapore.

That’s a lot when you think each time I give a set I also share the story behind the inspiration, the maker and the process. Tracelet can only be given in this way.

Sharing the story of the Tracelet Project at SID Melbourne 2012.

Sharing the story of the Tracelet Project at SID Melbourne 2012. Photo James Braund.

Something quite magical happens each time. Tracelet ceases to be a bracelet made of Injection moulded food grade plastic and instead becomes a talisman about the gift of sharing knowledge.

Tracelet has travelled all across the globe and found homes with inspired individuals. Sometimes they run into each other while wearing Tracelet and say ‘You must have met Christina!’. Such beautiful stories keep flowing in from all over the world.

Beautiful messages, images and thank yous continue to keep me inspired!

Beautiful messages, images and thank yous continue to keep me inspired!

I have received hundreds of thank you emails accompanied by images of people loving their Tracelets; wearing them for special events or in their everyday, or finding new ways to use them (drawing patterns or playing with them as earrings and crowns).

Thank you and stay tuned!

Chain reactions open at artisan: idea skill product in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane.

Chain Reaction opens at artisan: idea skill product in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane. Photography Christina Waterson.

The Chain Reaction opening was a fantastic gathering of diverse creative practitioners and excited guests. It was absolutely jam-packed with people and abuzz with a fabulous energy.

Anna and Elie Moubarouk with Her Honour the Governess of Queensland Penelope Winslet.

The beautiful Emma and Elie Moubarak with the Governor of Queensland, Ms Penelope Wensley AC. Photography Christina Waterson.

Before the formal proceedings three artists within one of the branches of the chain gave artist talks. They included Christina Waterson (artist and designer), Abe Muriata (painter and potter, traditional rainforest shield maker and self-taught weaver) and Brian Robinson (multi-skilled contemporary artist, whose practice includes painting, printmaking, sculpture and design). Here I share with you my introduction to Abe Muriata:

Elie Moubarak rang me out of the blue to let me know he’d nominated me for the Chain Reaction exhibition. It made my day – in fact it made my month! Thank you Elie. When he rang I was actually meticulously cutting up and painting hundreds of pieces of cardboard, and assembling them into my work Celestial Analogue.

Elie is a talented individual (Gerard’s Bistro, Laruche and Lychee Lounge; designer, maker and engineer) who brings other talented and unique people together through his diverse projects. Chain Reaction is one of those exciting projects.

It was lovely to speak with Elie. I got to hear about the interesting things he’d been working on and I shared mine. So often practitioners work away in their studios and don’t get the chance to hear how their work affects people or what other practitioners are up to. Chain Reaction opened up those lines of communication.

Making my choices of who I was going to nominate in the chain was easy. I followed my gut instinct. Ringing them was the hard thing. I had such respect for my selected practitioners, so was pretty nervous about calling them out of the blue.

I first developed a love of Bi-cornial baskets when I worked on the Story Place exhibition at the Queensland Art Gallery in 2003. Bi-cornial baskets or Jawans are traditionally woven by women. Abe is the only man to weave them and he brings exceptional skill, precision and material sensitivity to each of his works.

When I rang Abe Muriata and told him how much I respected him and his work  I cried – mainly because I was sharing quite personal thoughts on how I’ve loved living with one of his works for the past 10 years. Thank you Abe.

I wondered why I hadn’t gotten in touch before – why I hadn’t sent an email or called Abe or the Girrigun Aboriginal Arts Centre to let him know.

I would like to sincerely thank the team at artisan for envisioning Chain Reaction and opening up those lines of communication. I look forward to meeting all of the Chain Reaction creative practitioners and hearing about their inspirational works and links.

Thank you!

Christina Waterson, Chain Reaction Opening, 20 February 2013

Barbara Heath and Malcolm Enright's exquisite work.

Barbara Heath and Malcolm Enright’s exquisite work. Photography Christina Waterson.

Opening up lines of communication.

Open lines of communication. Photography Christina Waterson.

I loved meeting Chain Reaction creatives Abe Muriata, Emily Murray, Brian Robinson, Rebecca Ward and Remo Vallance.

I regret I didn’t meet every Chain Reaction artist on the night. I have made it my personal mission to get in touch with each of them to say hello!

Andrew Bartlett in Studio 6.

Highly skilled Furniture Designer/Maker Andrew Bartlett greets me in Studio 6 at JamFactory. Original post.

Meeting and getting to know uniquely talented people made my 2013 a special year. Here are a few of my favourite people portraits captured during 2013! Thank you to all of the creatives whose philosophies, generous spirit and beautiful work inspired me throughout the year!

Duncan Meerding in Adelaide Streets during Fringe Festival.

Designer/Maker Duncan Meerding in Adelaide Streets during Fringe Festival.

Asa with Phoebe Lamps

Åsa Jonasson with one of the beautiful Phoebe Lamps. Running into Phoebe post.

Jessamy

Jeweller Jessamy Pollock making paper studies in JamFactory’s Studio 5.

John Quan

Sunday arvo with designer John Quan in Studio 6 at Jamfactory Contemporary Craft and Design.

Designer Elliat Rich at Wood Opening 2013.

Designer/Curator Elliat Rich at Wood: Art Design Architecture exhibition opening, Adelaide 2013.

An afternoon drive in the Victorian Countryside with dear friends.

An afternoon drive in the Victorian Countryside with dear friend Cameron Bruhn.

Professor Raymond Quek, Dr. Paul Emmons and Christopher Hill. Photography Christina Waterson.

Professor Raymond Quek, Dr. Paul Emmons and Christopher Hill (Linedota) at Parallel Nippon exhibition opening.

Watching the talented Anna Varendorff share her beautiful jewellery at Six Jewellers Six Ways opening, Ari Athens Jewellery, Fortitude Valley.

Watching the talented Anna Varendorff share her beautiful jewellery at Six Jewellers Six Ways opening, Ari Athans Jewellery, Fortitude Valley.

Australian Designers Lunch at Space Furniture, Melbourne with Patricia Urquiola and Alberto Zontone.

Australian Designers’ Lunch at Space Furniture (Melbourne) with Designer Patricia Urquiola and Alberto Zontone. Lunch with Patricia Urquiola post here!