CMWaterson Flourish for the Milton 2015 - M

Looking up at part of Flourish – thrive prosper bloom 2015 a major public artwork realised for The Milton residences, Brisbane – Australia. Photography Christina Waterson

Hello there! Yes it’s been a while since I’ve posted to Tracepattern. In 2015 I’ve been super-busy on a number of projects: especially in realising a large scale public artwork entitled Flourish – thrive prosper bloom for The Milton residences. It’s almost complete and I’m so happy to finally share the project with you. More details of what I’ve been up to and, of course, the process of realising such a large scale work.

PS. In the mean time check out all of my latest news and inspiration at my official instagram site. It’s been a big year!

 

The launch of the Stellar Collection at Tait's Sydney Showroom. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of Tait.

The launch of the Stellar Collection at TAIT’S Sydney Showroom. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

The Stellar Collection was launched in Melbourne and Sydney during October and November 2014. I so enjoyed these events with TAIT because after all our hard work we shared Stellar with such lovely people. It’s a pleasure to post a transcript of the short speech I gave on the occasion of the launch of Stellar in Sydney, on 6 November 2014.

In the moment welcoming guests

Christina Waterson in the moment welcoming guests. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Thank you for sharing this special evening with us as we launch the Stellar Collection.

The Stellar Collection was inspired by the night sky. As a child I was in awe of the Milky Way’s beauty and would spend many a hot summer’s night out on the water tank star watching. My brothers and I would look for satellites and shooting stars, often making our own constellations using the stars we could see, and our different interests as a reference point. This playfulness is at the heart of the Stellar Collection as it encourages people to become modern-day astronomers, making their own constellations and patterns in the form of sculptural screens, ceilings, wall reliefs and objects.

While the names and patterns for our traditional constellations are inherited from Greek mythology, almost every culture on earth envisaged patterns in the stars that captured their unique culture and nature. For Stellar’s signature patterns I re-imagined the stars in the night sky to form a set of new constellations based on the patterns and lines of Australian flora and fauna.

Avid audience

Avid audience listens to Gordon Tait’s MCing for the Sydney Launch of Stellar. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Tonight we are launching three signature patterns in the Stellar Collection called Kingii, Banksia and Rosella. Kingii reflects the distinct form of the Frilled-neck lizard’s open mouth. Patterns within the Banksia’s flower spikes at different stages of growth and blooming are reflected in the Banksia pattern. And my favourite pattern in the collection, Rosella, captures the moment when a family of Rosellas (birdies) alight from feeding on grass seed and pine nuts.

My passion is to create large-scale intricate surfaces whose depth, detail, and effect on light and shadow transform and bring a finer grain to the spaces around us. Therefore it’ only natural that Stellar’s elements form sculptural screens, wall reliefs and ceilings. The elements also make both functional and sculptural objects and we have a few of our favourites on show tonight.

We are delighted to share the Stellar Collection with you and can’t wait to see the unique patterns, objects and colour combinations that you create with Stellar.

Thank you and enjoy the evening.

What a wonderful evening. Thank you to all who attended for making it so special!

What a wonderful evening made special by the lovely guests. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Gordon Tait and Susan Tait.

Gordon and Susan Tait sharing a special moment with Christina Waterson. Photography Fiona Susanto courtesy of TAIT.

Stellar is a credit to all involved in the process. A massive thank you to Susan and Gordon Tait for your generosity of spirit and belief in realising the Stellar Collection. Thank you to TAIT’S fabulous team whose skill and expertise across all areas of streamlining, fabricating and sharing Stellar make it unique. To Max&You thank you for your amazing energy on all things marketing and publicity of Stellar for TAIT, and especially such enjoyable launch events. Thank you Mr Cameron Bruhn for MCing Stellar’s Melbourne Launch, and Gordon Tait for MCing the Stellar’s Sydney Launch – you both brought a personal touch through the insights you shared.

Thank you to all who attended the launch events – it was great meeting such lovely, enthusiastic and talented individuals.

Visit TAIT for more information about the Stellar Collection.

Silky Oak in bloom. Photography Christina Waterson.

Silky Oak in bloom. Photography Christina Waterson.

I have had so many beautiful things make me smile and bring me joy over the last few months. A small selection is included here. You may notice that some of the images are in a square format. That’s because they are from my instagram account that I’ve been experimenting with. Check out more images and inspiration at my instagram.

Amazing visions of beauty by Fashion Designer and creative Force Gail Sorronda for her Mermaids Exist Collection. Pictured here is shimmering model Chelsea Crawford wearing the Undercurrent Neckpiece by Christina Waterson for Gail Sorronda. Hair by Redken Australia and Makeup by Mac Cosmetics.Photography by Megan Cullen. Photo Courtesy of Gail Sorronda.

Amazing visions of beauty by Fashion Designer and creative force Gail Sorronda for her Mermaids Exist Collection. Pictured here is shimmering model Chelsea Crawford wearing the Undercurrent Neckpiece by Christina Waterson for Gail Sorronda. Hair by Redken Australia and Makeup by Mac Cosmetics. Photography Megan Cullen. Photo Courtesy of Gail Sorronda.

Studio Artefact Student's work. I am pictured with Ross Summergreene as we critique our Studio's work for Project 1 in ARCH2200, University of Queensland. Photography by Daniel Byung.

Studio Artefact Student’s work. I am pictured with Ross Summergreene as we critique our Studio’s work for Project 1, ARCH2200 at The University of Queensland. Photography Daniel Byung.

Watching people watching fireworks. Photography Christina Waterson.

Watching people watching fireworks. Photography Christina Waterson.

Love for earthenware. Czech Deco circa 1920's to 30's by Ditmar Urbach pictured. Also sometimes known as 'Alienware' by US Collectors. Photography Christina Waterson.

Love for earthenware. Czech Deco circa 1920’s to 30’s by Ditmar Urbach pictured. Also sometimes known as ‘Alienware’ by US Collectors. Photography Christina Waterson.

Appreciating a unique moment after a storm. Photography Christina Waterson.

Appreciating a unique moment after a storm. Photography Christina Waterson.

Beautiful birdie vase from Cibi with a full tail of flowers by Minka. Photography Christina Waterson.

Beautiful birdie vase from Cibi with flower tail by Minka. Photography Christina Waterson.

The strange little things I collect, like these Japanese Sugar Sticks. Photography Christina Waterson.

The strange little things I collect like these Japanese Sugar Sticks. Photography Christina Waterson.

Launching the Stellar Collection with the amazing TAIT. Pictured is but one of the sculptural screens in the Stellar Collection. More on that to come! Photography Christina Waterson.

Launching the Stellar Collection with the amazing TAIT. More on that to come! Pictured is one of the sculptural screens in the Stellar Collection. I love those shadows.  Photography Christina Waterson.

 

 

My Torbreck Home and Studio of Seven Years. Photography Aidan Murphy.

My Torbreck Home and Studio of Seven Years. Photography Aidan Murphy 2008.

Maybe you’ve noticed I have been extremely quiet of late. I’ve been busy planning, packing and de-cluttering in preparation for moving from my precious Torbreck studio and home of seven years. It was a major undertaking, made more difficult by the success of my creative practice and a very busy 2014. A good problem to have – yes!

I launched my creative business from this studio in 2007. The unique light and outlook at Torbreck has been inspirational. Many of my collections including The Komodo Series 2008; The Bloom Series 2009; Scale Screen 2012; Shadow Set 2012 and Soft Cell 2012/14 were conceived or made as small tentative studies at this special address.

The Komodo Series 2008 by Christina Waterson including (L > R) Study, Solid X-Screen and Plexa Screen 2008. Photography Christina Waterson 2014.

The Komodo Series 2008 by Christina Waterson including (L > R) Poly Woven Study, X-Screen (Solid Edition) and Plexa Screen 2008. Photography Christina Waterson 2014.

Early morning in the studio, April 2014. Photography Christina Waterson 2014.

Early one morning in my Studio, April 2014. Photography Christina Waterson 2014.

2014 Portait Christina Waterson.

A special inspirational place. Me pictured with Fall 2002 and Taking Flight parts 2010. Portrait for 2014.

For me this place represents freedom and escape, light and openness, and I feel many of these aspects are part of the work I conceived and made while residing and working there in the sky. While I am deeply saddened to leave this special place I know an exciting new chapter is just beginning.

Home-in-Time-to-Catch-Sunset

Always home for sunset. Photography Christina Waterson 2014.

A special thank you to Linda, Ty, Alex and David from Torbreck who everyday go above and beyond to make Torbreck a special place to live and enjoy!

 

The Forbidden City

Dream Walking. At the heart of Beijing lies China’s Imperial Palace (from the Ming to the Qing Dynasties), now known as The Forbidden City; home to The Palace Museum. Photography Christina Waterson 2011.

I woke this morning to vivid memories of my visit to The Forbidden City in Beijing. My thoughts were settling on the entry courts and more intimate details all around in screens, soffits and artefacts. I was privileged to visit the Forbidden City as part of my Winston Churchill Fellowship in 2011.

Over the past few weeks I have had flashbacks from this life changing time and thoughts about each person I spent time with; visiting Keiji Ashizawa and his Tokyo studio; my friends at PolyU and SCAD in Hong Kong; Mr Ohashi San in Beppu; Arda in Istanbul… I spent time with such talented and passionate people.

It dawned on me that it’s three years this week since I embarked on my Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship Research. It’s three years since I started TRACEPATTERN to record and share the experience. The Fellowship broadened my practice. It dared me to dream large and have more belief in my direction and work.  It encouraged me to open out and through this process connect with highly skilled, intellectual and generous practitioners across the globe. Three years on I draw on this experience and knowledge as it continues to resonate through my life and work.

How the time has flown! To celebrate Tracepattern’s Anniversary I’ll be sharing previously unseen photography of the experience and re-sharing a few special posts made during my Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship.

Chrissy-on-Bike

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY TRACEPATTERN – THREE YEARS YOUNG!

 

CMWaterson White Infinity 2014 Runway MBFWA

White Infinity Headpiece 2014 for Gail Sorronda’s Mermaids Exist: As Above/So Below collection featured at 2014 Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Australia. Photography Courtesy of Gail Sorronda.

I just updated My Folio with a few lovely projects realised in the first half of 2014. Some I’ve posted about before, while others I am yet to share with you in more detail. The projects use a variety of materials, as well as fabrication techniques in combination with hand making by yours truly. ENJOY!

PS There’s still a few top-secret projects that I have to remain hush hush on…for now!

Night Time Street View of Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014.

Night Time Street View of Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014.

During April and May 2014 I was privileged to display Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014 Edition within artisan’s Ivory Street Window, Fortitude Valley. A small preliminary study of Soft Cell was first exhibited in 2012 as part of my solo exhibition Trace at Pinup Project Space, Melbourne. This study was made in cork rubber. By this time other studies and tests of Soft Cell at a small-scale had also been made in leather, felt and fabric.

Trace Exhibition Studies at Pinup 2012. Photography Tobias Titz.

Trace exhibition studies at Pinup Project Space in 2012. Study of Soft Cell 2012 top-far left. Photography Tobias Titz.

Soft Cell represented a deliberate desire to work with softer materials and forms. My Churchill Fellowship experience profoundly moved me to follow this softer approach, having predominantly worked with more linear and rectilinear geometric elements throughout my practice until that time. After my exhibition at Pinup Project Space I spent a busy year running around the countryside creative directing. There was not much time for making in the studio.

Soft Cell Ivory Street Window Installation prep.

Soft Cell Ivory Street Window Installation test layouts and preparation. April 2014.

In 2013 I committed to realising Soft Cell at a larger scale in more vibrant colours and everyday materials. A successful application in 2013 to display Soft Cell (Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream) 2014 Edition in artisan’s Ivory Street Window got the ball rolling.

After spending many years starting with hard materials and hard forms I found the result more often than not was “hard”. I set to making with soft materials and soft forms with a hope to relax and make softer works. Christina Waterson 2012

Soft undulating rhythmic forms make up the Soft Cell family. Each generation of form, while unique, originate from the same simple element combined in different ways. Making Soft Cell required me to move differently; using softer and less controlled movements than those used to make The Komodo Series and Bloom Series. These softer circular movements used different muscles in my body. Within the work the compression and tension imbued in each form’s surface did require my concentration and some good timing.

A sample of the layout options considered for the Ivory Street Edition of Soft Cell. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

A sample of the layout options considered for the Ivory Street Edition of Soft Cell. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell marked a shift from previous installations within the Ivory Street Window. My two previous installations within Ivory Street Window were more linear in nature. They were also made with a single material of predominantly one colour.  The Soft Cell 2014 installation could have taken an infinite number of layouts as shown above, in the preliminary sample options (L and C) for my original application. I decided on a geometric tartan layout (R).

Day time street view of Sequence 01 of Soft Cell.

Day time street view of Stage 02 of Soft Cell’s evolution. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Sequence of Growth Showing (L >R) Stage 02, Stage 03 and Stage 05. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Sequence of Growth (L >R) Stage 02, Stage 03 and Stage 05. Illustrations Christina Waterson.

The installation grew over time and evolved through a sequence of patterns. In doing this my hope was to draw people closer to inspect the work’s detail and form, and maybe ponder what the forms might remind them of, or how each colour might stir different memories and associations.

Vivid recollections and studies borne from a sense of rediscovering a distinctly Australian sense of nature and place are brought to light through this new collection. While the Domestic Bliss Exotic Dream Edition of Soft Cell uses everyday materials found in our homes, up close the materials’ colour, fluidity and overlay transport us to another place and suggest different flora, fauna and landscapes. One may see a hint of parrots, waves, jellyfish or a flourish of orchids in the overlapping arabesques. It’s these tactile curves and arabesques that form the essence of things – the soft cells. Christina Waterson Artist Statement 2014

Soft Cell Hues reminds me of orchids. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Hues. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Hues. Photography Christina Waterson.

Soft Cell Hues. Photography Christina Waterson.

CMWaterson-Tweaking-Soft-Cell-on-Opening-Night-15-May-2014

Tweaking Soft Cell on the opening night of the exhibition. Stage 05 of Soft Cell’s evolution. Photography Richard Stride for artisan.

My work continues on the Soft Cell family of surfaces and forms. STAY TUNED as this new collection truly reaches its full potential!